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Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

2 edition of Famine and factors affecting mortality in the USSR found in the catalog.

Famine and factors affecting mortality in the USSR

S. G. Wheatcroft

Famine and factors affecting mortality in the USSR

the demographic crises of 1914-1922 and 1930-33

by S. G. Wheatcroft

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  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Centre for Russian and East European Studies, University of Birmingham in Birmingham .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Mortality -- Soviet Union -- Statistics.,
  • Famines -- Soviet Union.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Steve Wheatcroft. Part 2, Appendices.
    GenreStatistics.
    SeriesCREES discussion papers -- 21
    The Physical Object
    Pagination44 p. ;
    Number of Pages44
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19219545M

    The factors affecting death are age, sex, diseases, heredity, nutritional level, health facility and services and health education. Three of them are described below: Age: Mortality rates are different in different age group. Mortality is high among children and old people but it is low among youths. This applied to the Great Irish Famine of , the Russian Famine of –, and the Bengal Famine of But epidemic diseases have played a less important role in subsequent famines and especially in the Soviet Famine of – and the Chinese Famine of .

    The dreadful famine that engulfed Ukraine, the northern Caucasus, and the lower Volga River area in was the result of Joseph Stalin's policy of forced collectivization. The heaviest losses occurred in Ukraine, which had been the most productive agricultural area of the Soviet Union.   The Causes of Famine and Mass Starvation. Famine can be caused by any number of factors. One of the most common reasons behind famine is climate change (as previously noted). When that happens drought, crop issues, and pestilence are often culprits. Famine can also be brought on by war and political problems.

      A famine is defined as a severe shortage of food that results in starvation and increased mortality. The major causes of famines include extreme population growth, crop failure, cold weather, and bad government policies. In modern times, people have learned to fight hunger with advanced agriculture, including the widespread use of fertilizers and irrigation to produce high-yielding crops.   ‘Famine’ is defined narrowly here as a food shortage leading directly to excess mortality from starvation or hunger-induced illnesses (compare Howe and Devereux ). By this definition, the 20th century presents a paradox in the history of famines. On the one hand, it witnessed in China in –61 the greatest famine in world history.


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Famine and factors affecting mortality in the USSR by S. G. Wheatcroft Download PDF EPUB FB2

Pre droughts and famines. In the 17th century, Russia experienced the famine of –, as a proportion of the population, believed to be its worst as it may have killed 2 million people (1/3 of the population).(5 million people estimated to have died Famine and factors affecting mortality in the USSR book famine).

Major famines include the Great Famine of –17, which affected much of Europe including part of Russia. The Russian famine of –22, also known as the Povolzhye famine, was a severe famine in the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic which began early in the spring of and lasted through This famine killed an estimated 5 million people, primarily affecting the Volga and Ural River regions, and peasants resorted to cannibalism.

The famine resulted from the combined effects. The Soviet famine of –33 was a major famine that killed millions of people in the major grain-producing areas of the Soviet Union, including Ukraine, Northern Caucasus, Volga Region and Kazakhstan, the South Urals, and West Siberia.

The Holodomor in Ukraine and Kazakh famine of –33 have been seen as genocide committed by Joseph Stalin's government. Wheatcroft, ‘Famine and Factors Affecting Mortality in the USSR: The Demographic Crises of –22 and –33’, CREES Discussion Papers 20 and 21 (Birmingham, ).

Google Scholar by: 2. This entry focuses on the history of famine and famine mortality over time. Our data include information only up to This does not include any data on the current food emergencies affecting Yemen, South Sudan, Somalia, Nigeria and information on these crises can be found at.

A famine is an acute episode of extreme hunger that results in excess mortality due to. roft, ‘Famine and factors affecting mortality in the USSR: The Demographic Crises of andSIPS, No 21 ; S.

Wheatcroft, The Significance of Climatic and Weather Change on Soviet Agriculture (with particular reference to. Throughout the book, a standard definition of famine is used: “Famine refers to a shortage of food or purchasing power that leads directly to excess mortality from starvation or hunger-induced disease” (p.

Famines occur when food is scarce. Scarcity, in turn, occurs when either food production or distribution is impaired (or both). The absence of an association between prenatal famine and long-term mortality does not exclude the possibility that there is a real effect if this effect is hidden by differences in early mortality.

As noted by Song et al. (), famine births have a lower long-term mortality compared with postfamine births. These famines caused a widespread scarcity of food and were responsible for numerous deaths across the country.

The most significant famines in this list are the great Bengal famine of caused around 10 million deaths, skull famine or Doji bara famine caused 11 million deaths and Chalisa famine which also caused 11 million deaths approximately.

Stalin and the Soviet Famine of Revisited. Michael Ellman, “Stalin and the Soviet Famine of Revisited,” Europe-Asia Studies Vol.

59 No. 4 (June ):URL. Michael Ellman examines Stalin’s statements, policies, and activities surrounding to determine purpose in the starvation of millions in Ukraine. Furthermore, both the US and the EU had significantly reduced humanitarian spending in the country in the run up to the famine.

Devereux, S. Famine in the Twentieth Century. IDS working paperde Waal, defines famine as ‘a crisis of mass hunger that causes elevated mortality over a. The famine stemmed from a variety of factors. Economic mismanagement and the loss of Soviet support caused food production and imports to decline rapidly.

A series of floods and droughts exacerbated the crisis. The North Korean government and its centrally planned system proved too inflexible to effectively curtail the disaster.

Estimates of the death toll vary widely. Out of a total. A famine is a widespread scarcity of food, caused by several factors including war, inflation, crop failure, population imbalance, or government phenomenon is usually accompanied or followed by regional malnutrition, starvation, epidemic, and increased inhabited continent in the world has experienced a period of famine throughout history.

Recently, we published a comprehensive dataset of famine mortality over the last years – the outcome of several months’ work that brings together a range of sources on particular famines into one place.

In this post we show that, despite the uncertainty that surrounds mortality estimates for many individual famines, the overall long-run trend is clear: in recent decades famine. After the Bolshevik Revolution ofthe ensuing Civil War produced acute food shortages in southwestern Russia.

Wartime devastation was compounded by two successive seasons of drought, and by it was clear that a full-scale famine was under way in. Objectives To determine whether starvation during periods of increased growth after birth have long term health consequences.

Design Analysis of cardiovascular risk factors and mortality in a longitudinal follow up after the siege of Leningrad. Mortality measured from up to the end of Setting St Petersburg, Russia (formerly Leningrad).

During the Asian currency crisis, the fall in GDP in many countries was accompanied by a fall in mortality (fig. 6); but in Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, and other economies in transition, transformational recession has resulted in an increase in mortality rates.

Figure 6: Mortality rates in Thailand, Russia, and Ukraine. Source: WDI database. The Soviet famine under Lenin in occurred during a civil war, but the famine in Ukraine in was a direct result of Stalin’s policies of collectivisation.

The Chinese famine ofwhich Rieff describes as “probably the most lethal single event in history”, was caused largely by Mao’s disastrous rush to industrialisation.

Abstract. Famine strikes the most vulnerable elements of society: children and the Soviet famine of –47 was no exception; the number of children who died before the age of 1 can be counted in hundreds of thousands. 3 But the fate of children during the postwar hunger is yet to be told.

In his monograph, V.F. Zima devotes only a handful of pages to how children endured during. The Special Period in Time of Peace (Spanish: Período especial) in Cuba was an extended period of economic crisis that began in primarily due to the dissolution of the Soviet Union and, by extension, the economic depression of the Special Period was at its most severe in the early to mids, before slightly declining in severity towards the end of the decade once Hugo.

In the previous century, more than 70 million people are estimated to have died during famines. In Amartya Sen published the book Poverty and Famine, which argued that starvation is due not to a lack of food, but simply to a lack of access to further argued that famine mortality did not occur in democracies because politicians would be held responsible for not preventing the.The late twenties and early thirties were perhaps the most transformative period in Soviet history.

It was during this period Stalin consolidated his grip on power and was allowed to rule with impunity, instituting his “revolution from above” on the Soviet people. He actively transformed the culture of the time, giving birth to a new Russian nationalism, rejecting the earlier Bolshevik.Consequently, war, food deficits, famine, and population displacement have been inextricably linked risk factors for increased mortality in certain large populations in Africa, Asia, Latin America.